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Landscape Character Assessment

This page explains and provides links to the landscape character assessment.

The landscape character assessment was written in 2005 as part of the baseline evidence for the then emerging local development framework and is still relevant to the emerging Local Plan.

Landscape Character Assessment - Main Report (PDF Document, 2.27 Mb)

Figures and appendices - Due to the size and nature of these files, please contact Planning Policy and Regeneration via email to request a copy of these documents. planningpolicy@oadby-wigston.gov.uk

Landscape Character Assessment

The Borough of Oadby and Wigston has a diverse range of landscapes including three town centres, residential areas, two green wedges, one country park (and a further proposed country park) and areas of open countryside which include the Grand Union Canal and the River Sence. The Council recognises that a high quality and locally distinctive rural and urban environment can make a sustainable contribution to quality of life in the borough and that sustainable development is essential to maintain this quality. The landscape character assessment was commissioned to provide recommendations to inform the Local Development Framework as well as to inform the effective management of the landscapes within the Borough.

What is a Landscape Character Assessment

Landscape character assessment is a process used to assist in planning and managing landscape change. Landscape refers to both natural features such as landform and water and those which are subject to human management processes such as hedges and woodlands. Landscape also includes man-made constructed features such as roads and buildings. The aim of landscape character therefore is to define areas with similar landscape character and attributes. This character can be used to inform planning decisions and to ensure that appropriate landscape management regimes are developed.

The European Landscape Convention (the first international convention to focus specifically on landscape) and which became binding in the UK in 2007 has recognised that people are an important element of the landscape character process. This convention is being implemented within the UK via Natural England and will need to be taken into account when the Council's landscape character assessment is reviewed.

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